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Journal Club - July Edition 3
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Why not choose intermittent self-catheterisation?

Payne, D (2021)  Why not choose intermittent self-catheterisation?  British Journal of Nursing. 30 (12) 696-698 DOI: 10.12968/bjon.2021.30.12.696

This case study highlights the challenges that may be encountered with long term indwelling catheters and explores the process of initiating intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) as an alternative bladder management method. The successful introduction of ISC despite a number of challenges asks why indwelling catheterisation is used so easily if it may not be in the best interests of the patient.

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Long-term rates of bladder dysfunction after decompression in patients with cauda equina syndrome

Seidel, H; Bhattacharjee, S; Pirkle, S; Shi, L; Strelzow, J; Lee, M; El Dafrawy, M. (2021) ‘Long-term rates of bladder dysfunction after decompression in patients with cauda equina syndrome.‘ The Spine Journal 21 (2021) 803−809

Cauda Equina Syndrome is rare and often only recognised after damage has occurred. This study explores whether people with Cauda Equina Syndrome have more long term bladder issues following surgery compared to others having the same surgery but for different reasons. It highlights the challenges that this patient group faces and suggests that bladder care should be an important consideration in the follow up of people with Cauda Equina Syndrome.

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Adherence to transanal irrigation in older adults: first-year assessment

Chesnel, C.; Hentzen, C.; Haddad, R.; Charlanes, A.; Le Breton, F.; Turmel, N.; Amarenco, G. (2021) ‘Adherence to transanal irrigation in older adults: first-year assessment’ Techniques in Coloproctology https://doi.org/10.1007/s10151-021-02479-8

This study investigates the long term concordance with trans anal irrigation amongst adults over the age of 65. It found that little difference exists between this age group and the general population suggesting that trans anal irrigation is an effective treatment option for older adults.

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Problems people with spinal cord injury experience accessing help with bowel care when hospitalised outside a specialist spinal injury service

Pryor, J; Haylen, D. and Fisher, M (2021) ‘Problems people with spinal cord injury experience accessing help with bowel care when hospitalised outside a specialist spinal injury service’ Journal of Clinical Nursing 2021; 30(11-12):1633-1644

People need long term support with their bowel routine following a spinal cord injury (SCI). This qualitative study discusses the impact of hospital admission on the bowel routines of people with SCI. Although this research was carried out in Australia, many of the issues raised have previously been identified closer to home. It highlights the concern that a hospital admission may place someone at greater risk of harm simply because their bowel routine is not followed.